American Essence is a magazine for anyone who loves America.


It celebrates America's contribution to humanity.

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What people are saying

What drew me to want to subscribe is the focus on things and people in America. Stories of traditional American values and creativity regardless of race, color or creed.
- Deborah Smith
With all the negative media coverage of America, and the twisted, commercialized version of America and Americans that are pushed on our American society as truth, it is refreshing to find a magazine like American Essence. This magazine tells real stories of real Americans, which reflect what is good and true about America.
- Jeff K
I really enjoy the stories of small businesses I would have otherwise never known about. It really captures the true spirit of Americans. I also enjoy learning about the history of America through your magazine.
- Adam Dickerson
Never in my lifetime has there been a greater need to recognize and share what is good, positive, hopeful, commendable, generous, ingenious, amazing, wonderful... the ESSENCE... about America. Perfect name for this outstanding publication.
- K. B.
Educational, in-depth, first class articles. Heartwarming American story sharing by informed authors. Fantastic art and photography. Unique and awesome publication.
- S. Lyn Samuelson
My children are bombarded with media messaging that intentionally tries to tear down this country and divide its people. But they will come to know better. American Essence is a beacon of hope in an ocean of chaos.
- James Michaletz
Your magazine gives me chills when I read it, the kind I feel when I salute our flag. It inspires unity, with good old fashioned common sense stories about people keeping their faith in liberty.
- Kellee Scammell
Wanted to support your publication as it represents what is missing in the media; integrity, moral standards, and positivity. A wonderful "read" that will be shared historically in the future with family and friends. Image great grandchildren reading and learning from American Essence in years to come.
- Jane Bush
We need publications that highlight the diversity and creativity that life in America affords. I thought the first edition of American Essence was beautifully written and presented. I plan to buy several gift subscriptions for family members.
- Kari Wszolek
American Essence magazine is beautifully produced. The articles are interesting, well written and inspiring. I read the magazine from cover to cover. I also enjoy the photography and artwork.
- Elaine Young
I am 75 years old and have children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. I want them to know the true America I grew up in. I find that the schools today are not teaching the true story of America and what a wonderful country we are. American Essence may some day be one of the few sources for our future Americans to read and learn about the true America.
- Lillian Davis
The magazine is a keepsake. The photography is wonderful and the articles interesting. Thank you for producing something hopeful, intelligent, and informative.
- Patricia Snyder

FOCUS

From History to Future

American Essence brings you the best of America, past and present, to help you create a better future for yourself and the country.

Timeless Values

American Essence highlights the morals and traditional values that guided the nation's Founding Fathers. It shares stories embodying the ideals and virtues that form this land of liberty.
Timeless

Perseverance

American Essence seeks to uplift the mind and heart by telling the story of America, with all its perilous moments, providential triumphs, and ordinary individuals pushing for the changes that have shaped the nation.
Man

What people are saying

What drew me to want to subscribe is the focus on things and people in America. Stories of traditional American values and creativity regardless of race, color or creed.
- Deborah Smith
With all the negative media coverage of America, and the twisted, commercialized version of America and Americans that are pushed on our American society as truth, it is refreshing to find a magazine like American Essence. This magazine tells real stories of real Americans, which reflect what is good and true about America.
- Jeff K
I really enjoy the stories of small businesses I would have otherwise never known about. It really captures the true spirit of Americans. I also enjoy learning about the history of America through your magazine.
- Adam Dickerson
Never in my lifetime has there been a greater need to recognize and share what is good, positive, hopeful, commendable, generous, ingenious, amazing, wonderful... the ESSENCE... about America. Perfect name for this outstanding publication.
- K. B.
Educational, in-depth, first class articles. Heartwarming American story sharing by informed authors. Fantastic art and photography. Unique and awesome publication.
- S. Lyn Samuelson
My children are bombarded with media messaging that intentionally tries to tear down this country and divide its people. But they will come to know better. American Essence is a beacon of hope in an ocean of chaos.
- James Michaletz
Your magazine gives me chills when I read it, the kind I feel when I salute our flag. It inspires unity, with good old fashioned common sense stories about people keeping their faith in liberty.
- Kellee Scammell
Wanted to support your publication as it represents what is missing in the media; integrity, moral standards, and positivity. A wonderful "read" that will be shared historically in the future with family and friends. Image great grandchildren reading and learning from American Essence in years to come.
- Jane Bush
We need publications that highlight the diversity and creativity that life in America affords. I thought the first edition of American Essence was beautifully written and presented. I plan to buy several gift subscriptions for family members.
- Kari Wszolek
American Essence magazine is beautifully produced. The articles are interesting, well written and inspiring. I read the magazine from cover to cover. I also enjoy the photography and artwork.
- Elaine Young
I am 75 years old and have children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. I want them to know the true America I grew up in. I find that the schools today are not teaching the true story of America and what a wonderful country we are. American Essence may some day be one of the few sources for our future Americans to read and learn about the true America.
- Lillian Davis
The magazine is a keepsake. The photography is wonderful and the articles interesting. Thank you for producing something hopeful, intelligent, and informative.
- Patricia Snyder

FOCUS

From History to Future

Timeless Values

Perseverance

American Essence brings you the best of America, past and present, to help you create a better future for yourself and the country.
American Essence highlights the morals and traditional values that guided the nation's Founding Fathers. It shares stories embodying the ideals and virtues that form this land of liberty.
American Essence seeks to uplift the mind and heart by telling the story of America, with all its perilous moments, providential triumphs, and ordinary individuals pushing for the changes that have shaped the nation.
Timeless
Man
Steve Case
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A Champion for American Innovation

Entrepreneur Steve Case, who co-founded AOL, makes the case for investing in startups in America’s heartland

By Annie Wu
What do an at-home water testing kit company, a luxury watchmaker, and an online farmland real estate investment platform have in common?

First, they were started in America’s heartland—Zionsville, Indiana; Detroit, Michigan; and Fayetteville, Arkansas, respectively—far from the usual, bicoastal venture capital hubs. Second, their initial potential was spotted and funded by AOL co-founder Steve Case and his team of investors, as part of his Rise of the Rest Seed Fund’s efforts to find and invest in the most innovative startups outside of Silicon Valley. The watchmaker, Shinola, is one of the more familiar names, but hundreds of start-ups have flourished so far under Case’s initiative.

The premise behind his idea is simple: Local entrepreneurs know the problems that face their communities, and they know the solutions. What they need is funding.

For example, in 2016, the founder of the at-home water testing kit company, Megan Glover, simply wanted to find out if her local water was safe for her children to drink. When her local utility company proved unhelpful, and a local water testing company quoted a whopping sum of $3,000 for a test, she took matters into her own hands. Today, her company, 120Water, fills about 100,000 kits a year, each sold for $50 to $80, in use across 180,000 locations in the country. Government agencies, schools, and local water systems across more than 19 states use its products.

When Case held a pitch competition in Indianapolis in 2017, a stop on one of his cross-country Rise of the Rest bus tours, Glover had taken the chance to present her pitch. Case was immediately intrigued. “The idea was simple to grasp, completely original, and it addressed a true need in the community,” he wrote in his new book, “The Rise of the Rest: How Entrepreneurs in Surprising Places are Building the New American Dream,” which documents his findings after his tours. Glover was chosen to win $100,000 to start her company.

Inspiring Transformation

After leaving AOL in 2005, Case launched Revolution to back entrepreneurs with growth, venture, and seed funds. Since 2014, Case and Revolution have traveled the country by bus, holding a pitch competition and awarding $100,000 to a winning company at every stop. In 2017, Revolution launched the first $150 million Rise of the Rest Seed Fund, backed by well-known entrepreneurs like Eric Schmidt, Jeff Bezos, Tory Burch, and the Walton family (Walmart); a second $150 million seed fund was announced in 2019. Today, the bus tours continue, but the majority of the Fund’s investments are made outside the pitch competition. The Fund has since backed more than 200 companies across 100 cities.

Through his tours, Case has witnessed how industries are being transformed and people’s lives made easier through inventive ideas—thanks to people like Glover who have the pulse on what’s going on in their communities and want to see them thrive. Tech hubs are emerging everywhere, spurring innovation in heartland cities and small towns that were once neglected following America’s manufacturing decline.

“A lot of places are struggling and feeling left out and left behind. If we can back new companies that can create new kinds of jobs and create more hope and opportunity in those communities, and do that in enough places, it also has the potential to help lift up, and maybe even in a small way, unite a very divided country,” Case said in an interview.

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This article was originally published in volume 2, issue 12 of American Essence.

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America’s Tragic Hero

The Yankee baseball player was a titan on the field, humble as a man, and beloved by millions during a time when America most needed heroes

By Dustin Bass
Earle F. Zeigler, a founder of the North American Society of Sport Management, once wrote that “from antiquity we know that ‘hero’ was the name given to a man of ‘superhuman strength, courage, or ability, favoured by the gods; regarded later as demigod and immortal.’” He further defined a cultural hero as “a mythicized historical figure who embodies the aspirations or ideals of a society.” In his essay “Babe Ruth or Lou Gehrig: A United States Dilemma,” Zeigler concluded that if America did have a cultural hero, it was not Babe Ruth, but rather Lou Gehrig.

The Gift Is Gone

In late June 1939, America was dumbfounded at the news that Lou Gehrig―baseball’s Iron Horse―was retiring. The New York Yankees announced that July 4 would be “Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day.” Gehrig had become a national icon, a hero. The Fourth of July is meant for celebrating national heroes, but this year it was a day of mourning. Gehrig was not simply retiring; he was dying.

Gehrig stood at home plate. His feet close together at the corner of the chalked box, his doffed cap tucked under his right arm. His eyes focused on the ground, only poking his head up every so often to glance at the speaker or receive a gift. For the previous 16 years, Gehrig had made home plate his home. It was where his strength captivated audiences. Now, they were captivated by the tragedy that his strength had vanished.

In so many ways, Gehrig had become that mythicized figure. He was blessed with superhuman ability, power, and endurance. He demonstrated that fact by crushing 493 home runs. He played in 2,130 consecutive games, a feat unthinkable and a record that seemed unbreakable. His threshold for pain was otherworldly. Gehrig had won two Most Valuable Player awards, a Triple Crown, and was a seven-time All Star (the first All Star Game for Major League Baseball was in 1933). He led the Yankees to seven World Series, of which they won six. He batted clean up on the most feared offense in MLB history―the 1927 lineup known as Murderers’ Row. He had 13 straight seasons of at least 100 runs batted in (RBIs) and 100 runs scored. He set the still-standing single-season American League record for RBIs with 185. Gehrig was the Yankees’ all-time hits leader, and he would remain so for 70 years. His gift was baseball, but now that gift was gone—rescinded, as if the baseball gods had cursed him for achieving such divine status.

Subscribe to The Epoch Times to read the articles in full online
This article was originally published in volume 2, issue 10 of American Essence.

Lou Gehrig
US Deputy Marshal Wiley G. Haines
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Taming the Last Frontier

In a rough and dangerous era, US Deputy Marshal Wiley G. Haines upheld the law in Oklahoma Territory

By J.D. Haines
Even as a youngster growing up overseas, Oklahoma was always “home.” It was also the homeland of my childhood hero. I never had the privilege of meeting my hero, as he died in 1928, but my father told me amazing stories about my great-grandfather, U.S. Deputy Marshal Wiley G. Haines. As a result, I grew to know him very well.

As a boy, I can remember sneaking out of bed past my bedtime to hide behind a chair and watch my favorite TV show, “Gunsmoke.” Marshal Matt Dillon was my TV hero, but in time I became much more impressed with the exploits of my real-life hero and great-grandfather.

Haines grew up in Missouri, where his father, the Rev. John W. Haines, helped found what is now known as Southwest Baptist University. As a youth, he had many adventures, including making a cattle drive and journeying to California. Haines taught for a short time at Southwest Baptist, but the Land Run in Oklahoma Territory (OT) in 1889 intrigued him. He staked a claim in what would become downtown Oklahoma City and went into the real estate business. But the real estate life was too tame for Haines, who began his law enforcement career in 1890 as a deputy sheriff in Oklahoma City.

In 1893, the Cherokee Outlet was opened for another land run. Six million acres and approximately 100,000 new citizens were added to Oklahoma Territory in one afternoon. Haines got a job as an undersheriff, and he and his new wife, Sarah, lived on a farm near Perry, OT. His job kept him busy patrolling a section of Perry aptly called Hell’s Half-Acre. Perry had literally sprung up overnight due to the land run, with 25,000 citizens. Over 100 saloons, gambling dens, and dance halls gave ample opportunity for mischief. In addition, an average of one and a half killings per day kept Haines and his colleagues occupied with the monumental task of keeping the peace.

By 1898, Haines had received a federal commission as a U.S. Deputy Marshal and relocated to the Osage Indian Reservation in northeast Oklahoma Territory. There, he worked for the next 30 years, dispensing his brand of frontier justice. My father’s stories eventually sparked 10 years of research for a biography of Wiley Haines, which I published 20 years ago. I learned a great deal by sorting through two trunks of his papers that my father had recovered from Haines’s old home in Hominy, Oklahoma. Writing the book was like an adventure, uncovering and preserving tales from a bygone era—such as his shoot-out with the infamous Martin brothers in 1903.

The Martins had robbed and murdered across three states, including robbing over 100 people on the way to a picnic in one afternoon. The Martins’ reign of terror ended when they came up against Haines and his two deputies. The outlaws were shot and killed, and Haines was seriously wounded, but recovered.

A big part of Haines’s duties was serving as the chief of Osage Indian Police. He learned the Osage language and became a trusted friend of the tribe. He represented the tribe at the Department of Interior in Washington, D.C. Haines took particular pleasure in watching the Osages become the wealthiest people per capita on Earth when oil was discovered on their reservation. He was presented a solid gold French pocket watch by an Osage chief as a token of the tribe’s thanks. The watch remains a treasured heirloom of the family today.

The assignment as a Deputy Marshal in Indian and Oklahoma Territories was one of the most difficult law enforcement jobs in the country. Most of the officers performed their duties single-handedly and without fanfare. They were true professionals, far removed from the Hollywood version of a lawman.

Haines described the times as follows: “The country was teeming with horse thieves, whisky peddlers, and every sort of fugitive. The officer’s job was often made difficult by the lack of help provided by the citizens who were cowed by the outlaws.”

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This article was originally published in volume 3, issue of American Essence.
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A French Chef’s American Legacy

Jacques Pépin, as eager a student as he is generous a teacher, shares about his journey to New York, his must-have Thanksgiving recipes, and his lifetime teaching generations of Americans how to cook

By Crystal Shi
If you’re inviting Jacques Pépin to Thanksgiving dinner, you’d better have turkey on the table.

How about something else this year, you might venture—a nice roast chicken, or a glazed ham?

“I don’t want to do something else,” the chef would kindly, but firmly, inform you. “I want to have a turkey for Thanksgiving; I want to do Brussels sprouts and sweet potato and an apple tart.” The bird has been a non-negotiable since Pépin’s first Thanksgiving in 1959, two months after he arrived in America as an eager young chef with experience working in Paris’s most prestigious kitchens. He fell in love with the spirit of the holiday—“There is no political affiliation, no religious affiliation; it’s just people getting together, enjoying food, wine, and company,” he said—and with America itself.

“I only came to stay a year, maybe two years, to learn the language, and go back to France. I loved it and never went back—except for vacation.” Since then, the transplanted Frenchman has taught millions of Americans how to cook.

He’s the author of 32 cookbooks, the most recent being “Art of the Chicken,” published in September 2022, and a longtime host of PBS cooking shows—including one with his dear friend and fellow pioneering TV chef, Julia Child. Since the beginning of the pandemic, he’s continued to offer confidence and comfort to anxious, sheltering-at-home viewers with the award-winning “Jacques Pépin: Cooking at Home” web series, in 280-and-counting 2- to 6-minute videos posted to Instagram and Facebook with the help of his daughter, Claudine.

At nearly 87, Pépin still chops and sautés ​​with an efficient, effortless fluency honed over decades of experience. His narration is just as easy and precise, deftly doling out instruction as he breaks down a whole chicken or shimmies a perfectly fluffed French omelet onto a plate.

And after all these years, he still cooks with an unmistakable French accent—though he’d argue that it doesn’t extend so much to the food. “Very often, people consider me the quintessential French chef,” Pépin said from his home in Madison, Connecticut, where he’s lived since 1975.

“And then you open one of my books, and there on page 32, you have a black bean soup with banana and cilantro on top.” Pépin’s late wife, Gloria, was half Puerto Rican and half Cuban. “Then you have a Kentucky fried chicken from Howard Johnson. Then you have a lobster roll from Connecticut. So I mean,” he said, smiling, “I’m probably the quintessential American chef now, after all these years.”

Dreaming of America

Born in Bourg-en-Bresse, France, a small town northwest of Lyon, Pépin grew up helping out in his parents’ restaurant, Le Pélican. At age 13, he left school to begin a culinary apprenticeship at the Grand Hôtel de L’Europe. By his early 20s, he’d worked his way up Paris’s culinary ladder, and, during his military service, he served as personal chef to three French heads of state, including Charles de Gaulle.

But he set his sights on farther shores.

“America was always kind of the Golden Fleece for me,” Pépin said. “Most people who come to America come here for economic reasons, to have a better life maybe, or political reasons, or religious reasons. I didn’t really have any of that. I had a very good job in Paris. My parents had a restaurant. I was fine. But I wanted to come to America.”

At the age of 23, he made good on his wish. He arrived in New York in September 1959. He didn’t mean to stay for long, but life changed his plans.

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This article was originally published in volume 2, issue 11 of American Essence.

Jacques Pépin
Snorkeling in Alaska
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Snorkeling Alaska

Discover what may be the most densely populated ecosystem on Earth

by Eric Lucas
Cucumbers move.

Not fast, mind you, maybe 6 inches a minute. But moving they are, and I’m watching, on a bright, early summer morn near Ketchikan, Alaska. The encounter represents several exotic facets of modern American life, ranging from visionary business formation to impressive garment technology to the wonders of nature. And it’s a profound travel experience that may be quite unique.

Of course, real cucumbers don’t move on their own. These are a maritime version I’m goggling at—sea cucumbers: echinoderms and not at all vegetative—but they do look like kosher dills on steroids, gherkin-shaped, colored like grass clippings, extravagantly plump, foot-long. Five of them have gathered on a large, flat slab of stone, as if it were coffee-break and the rock an office kitchen.

I’m gawking at them through a snorkel mask. That’s what’s afoot here: snorkeling in Alaska. The tour operation that has brought a dozen visitors to a small cove at Mountain Point, south of Ketchikan, is called, accurately, Snorkel Alaska; it hands hardy souls wet suits, snorkels, cautions, and guidance on how to go about pursuing a tropical pastime in sub-Arctic seas. Then, it stuffs everyone in a small van and hauls the adventurers down the road to the beach.

OK, it’s not really sub-Arctic. Ketchikan is about as far south as you can go and still be in Alaska. Nonetheless, the excursion is as close to extreme as most of the company’s customers will ever get. These waters are not balmy. We’re at 55.3 degrees north, the same latitude as Labrador and Siberia.

And it’s not really a beach. Jumbled rocks greet first-time North Pacific snorkelers who must clamber carefully into the water and bob like Michelin men in the slight chop of Tongass Narrows. If you think rock-scrambling is difficult under ordinary circumstances, try encasing yourself in neoprene balloons to do it.

So why do so?

An extravagance of natural wonder. The undersea gardens of the North Pacific are in their own way as magical, mysterious, and memorable as any tropical reef.

Subscribe to The Epoch Times to read the articles in full online
This article was originally published in volume 2, issue 8 of American Essence.
Cowboy
CONTENT

American Essence Covers

Entrepreneurs
Family
Small Farms
Movie & TV
History
Immigrant Stories
Historic Buildings
The Great Outdoors
Made in America
Homeschooling
Giving Back to the Community
Small Town Living
Founding Fathers
American Artists

About American Essence

American Essence focuses on traditional American values and great American stories. It recounts significant historical events, from the time of the Founding Fathers through today, including average Americans who want to give back to their communities and country.


American Essence celebrates America's contributions to humanity. America has been the flagship of the free world. It has gone through difficult times—many times—but it has been prosperous because it is blessed. It is a land like no other for those seeking freedom of belief, staying true to the motto “in God we Trust.” It is this enduring belief and its core ideals that have carried America through and kept it strong. This, and much more, is what serves as the nation's great legacy.
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Frequently Asked Questions

What is American Essence?

American Essence is a monthly magazine with stories about the people, places, and influences that embody the ideals and virtues that formed America. It celebrates the everyday individuals who grow our food, start small businesses, raise families, build communities, and preserve traditional culture for generations to come—the heart and soul of America.
When should I expect the first issue after subscribing?

The first issue will be published on June 3, 2021, and it will be mailed out to subscribers through USPS, from New Jersey, on the same day. It will reach you in about one week to two weeks, depending on your mailing zip code. The cutoff time for new subscribers who want to receive the first issue is May 31, 2021. If you subscribe after the cutoff time, you will receive American Essence magazine starting from the next issue.
Do I get a free magazine subscription if I have a subscription to another product such as print, digital, or TV?

No. You have to order your American Essence subscription separately.